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Huawei posts revenue growth in H1 despite sanctions and pandemic

Huawei posts revenue growth in H1 despite sanctions and pandemic

Huawei reported a 13.1% year-over-year revenue growth in the first half of 2020, even if countries around the world continued to weigh up bans on its equipment and smartphone sales shrink amid the pandemic, the telecom giant said in a brief on Monday.

The firm’s revenue reached 454 billion yuan ($64.88 billion) in the period, with its carrier, enterprise, and consumer businesses accounting for 35%, 8% and 56% of total revenue, respectively. It finished with a net profit margin of 9.2%, a slight increase from 8.7% in the same period last year.

The privately-owned company did not specify what contributed to its H1 growth, but said in the release that amid the COVID-19 pandemic, “information and communications technologies” — the main focus of its business — “have become not only a crucial tool for combatting the virus, but also an engine for economic recovery.”

The growth came amid the U.S.’s

Trump’s account is back on Twitch following ‘hateful conduct’ suspension

Trump’s account is back on Twitch following ‘hateful conduct’ suspension

It’s been two weeks since Reddit and Twitch made key moves to ban political content over service violations. As Twitch noted at the time, its suspension of the official Trump account was just temporary. Following earlier reports, the service confirmed with TechCrunch that the account had been reinstated.

A spokesperson for the company also reiterated its original statement on the matter, noting, “Hateful conduct is not allowed on Twitch. In line with our policies, President Trump’s channel has been issued a temporary suspension from Twitch for comments made on stream, and the offending content has been removed.”

The suspension was triggered by two pieces of content. First there’s the campaign kickoff, which included the infamous line, “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. […] They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists.”

And then there’s the recent Tulsa rally, which included this bit, “Hey, it’s 1:00 o’clock

Edtech exits show a need for better plumbing

Edtech exits show a need for better plumbing

The world’s massive experiment with remote learning has done more than emphasize the cracks in the way we learn. It’s brought much needed attention and capital to potential solutions.

But it’s not just investors who are flurrying to the space; edtech incumbents are taking notice, too. Recent acquisitions show that edtech’s growth spurt is forcing incumbents to think bigger and scoop talent along the way.

India edtech giant Byju encapsulates how to strategize around momentum. In June, the company raised money at a $10.5 billion valuation. It currently leads India’s online edtech market. Days later, TechCrunch learned that the company is in talks to acquire two-year-old education learning app Doubtnut for $125 million.

It’s because Doubtnut has a hold in a place that Byju doesn’t: smaller, localized towns and villages within India. While Byju might be a household name within India’s larger cities, the buy could help it expand to

More new space consolidation as Voyager Space Holdings acquires Pioneer Astronautics

More new space consolidation as Voyager Space Holdings acquires Pioneer Astronautics

It’s beginning to be a sign of the times: smaller or younger space companies getting acquired by larger entities. Today, the company being acquired is Pioneer Astronautics, which has been bought by Voyager Space Holdings in a combined cash and stock deal. Voyager, which bills itself as the “first space-focused holding company,” now has a portfolio that includes both Pioneer and Altius Space Machines, which it acquired last year.

Pioneer Astronautics was founded in 1996, and focuses on R&D of new technologies related to space exploration. The company’s focus of late has been on sustainable human space exploration, including leveraging materials found on deep-space destinations, including the moon, and turning them into resources that are required for sustained human presence in those places. Pioneer was actually selected by NASA recently to research materials systems for use under the Artemis program, for instance, and it plans to demonstrate how it’s possible

Superstrata opens pre-orders on a pair of 3D-printed bicycles

Superstrata opens pre-orders on a pair of 3D-printed bicycles

There’s one thing I can’t stop thinking about every time I look at the Superstrata: Just how quickly the thing would get stolen. That’s no knock against the bike itself — in fact, it’s probably a point in its favor. If anything, it’s probably just another in a long list of signs that I’ve been living in New York City for too long.

The Superstrata Ion is a $4,000 bike. But it’s not just any $4,000 bike (I likely wouldn’t be writing about it if it were). In addition to looking quite slick, the unibody bike is 3D printed from a single piece of carbon fiber material. The approach makes it possible for the company to essentially deliver a custom bike to the rider’s body. And despite its seemingly hefty price tag, the Ion is still cheaper than most traditionally constructed carbon fiber bikes, which can cost as much as