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The JavaScript Framework That Puts Web Pages on a Diet

The JavaScript Framework That Puts Web Pages on a Diet

Websites are too damn big.

The average web page is about 2 megabytes, according to HTTP Archive, a site that tracks the performance of websites and the technologies they use. Sure you can download 2 megabytes in less than a second on a good 4G mobile connection. But today’s web pages are problematic for people on slow connections or with small bandwidth caps. Not all that long ago, a complex game or software program fit on a 1.4 megabyte floppy disk.

There are many reasons today’s web is so bloated, including the ads and tracking scripts that saddle so many pages. Another reason is that websites do much more than just display text and images. Many sites now look and feel like full-blown desktop applications.

To build these interactive sites, many web developers turn to open source packages that handle common tasks. These tools liberate programmers from a lot of

The Coronavirus Relief Bill Promotes Surveillance for Health

The Coronavirus Relief Bill Promotes Surveillance for Health

President Trump on Friday signed the largest relief bill in US history, a $2 trillion lifeline to businesses, hospitals, and workers hit hard by the explosive spread of the coronavirus. More than 160,000 Americans have tested positive for the virus, according to the John Hopkins Coronaviurus resource center, more than any other country. But some civil liberties advocates and government watchdogs worry that the measure could enable new types of surveillance of Americans, without adequate privacy safeguards. They fear that emergency provisions could become routine over time.

In addition to payments to workers, the bill provides $150 billion for public health, including $4.3 billion for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The money is allocated for increased testing, desperately needed protective equipment for doctors and nurses, and new preventive measures. This includes $500 million for a “public health surveillance and data collection system” meant to track the spread of

Open Source Fonts Are Love Letters to the Design Community

Open Source Fonts Are Love Letters to the Design Community

Font families can sell for hundreds of dollars. Gotham, a popular typeface used by President Barack Obama’s campaign and many others, costs nearly $1,000 to license a complete set of 66 different styles. But The League of Moveable Type, gives all of its fonts away for free. What’s more, it makes them open source, so that other people can modify the fonts and make their own versions of them.

And people have. Raleway, designed by Matt McInerney and released in 2010, was expanded from a single weight into a family with nine weights, from “thin” to bold to “black,” each with matching italics, in 2012 by Pablo Impallari, Rodrigo Fuenzalida, and Igino Marini. It’s now one of the most popular font families on Google Fonts, a collection of free fonts hosted by the search giant.

Over the past decade, companies ranging from startups like the IT tool company Datto to

What Amazon Workers Are Facing as Coronavirus Spreads in the US

What Amazon Workers Are Facing as Coronavirus Spreads in the US

Jana Jumpp has been working at an Amazon fulfillment center in Jeffersonville, Indiana, for over four years. Until recently, her experience at the company had been great. Amazon helped pay for Jumpp to go to massage therapy school, and even sent her to assist with the opening of a new facility in Texas last year.

Then, the pandemic hit, and everything changed. “Amazon’s reaction to the coronavirus has left me shocked, scared, and disgusted,” Jumpp said on a call with reporters Wednesday. The call was organized by Athena, a coalition of local and national organizations critical of Amazon. Jumpp says the company hasn’t provided enough supplies like hand sanitizer at her facility, and that its current leave policy won’t be enough to prevent people from coming to work sick. “Because of my age, I am more susceptible to the virus,” said Jumpp, who is 58. “I am taking unpaid time