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Where Are the Adults in the Clubhouse?

Where Are the Adults in the Clubhouse?

Then, last week on Twitter, a VC named Balaji Srinivasan wrote a mocking reply to one of Lorenz’s tweets, involving alleged misbehavior of the CEO of the luggage startup Away. Lorenz defended herself and called out what she characterized as previous harassment by Srinivasan and others on a variety of platforms, including Clubhouse. A battle of tweets ensued, and a wider argument erupted around the increasing animus between press and venture capitalists.

The controversy moved to Clubhouse that night, when a roomful of VCs and others continued the discussion. (There is a record of this, courtesy of Motherboard, which obtained a leaked audio.) Lorenz was called to the stage, but before she could speak, the moderator called Srinivasan to the stage. “I literally hadn’t even said two words out of my mouth,” she says. Disgusted, Lorenz left, but the conversation continued, with Lorenz as a subject. When someone pointed out

Uber Moves Stealthily to Gain Allies in a Fight With Cities

Uber Moves Stealthily to Gain Allies in a Fight With Cities

In February, the outreach director for an organization called Communities Against Rider Surveillance wrote to Evan Greer. CARS wanted to know if Fight for the Future, a nonprofit digital-rights advocacy group where Greer is the deputy director, would join, and allow itself to be listed as a member of the newly formed coalition.

“CARS is a new coalition working to raise awareness of a dangerous technology called Mobility Data Specification,” the email from outreach director Rich Dunn read. “In the wrong hands, the information collected by MDS poses grave privacy and safety risks.”

MDS is a technical specification created by Los Angeles’ Department of Transportation, now managed by a third-party foundation. The city, and more than 20 others, use it to track the movement of shared bikes and scooters. Operators of those services must hand over anonymized, close-to-real-time and daily data on vehicle trips; Los Angeles officials can also use

5G Was Going to Unite the World—Instead It’s Tearing Us Apart

5G Was Going to Unite the World—Instead It’s Tearing Us Apart

The world came together to build 5G. Now the next-generation wireless technology is pulling the world apart.

The latest version of the 5G technical specifications, expected Friday, adds features for connecting autonomous cars, intelligent factories, and internet-of-things devices to crazy fast 5G networks. The blueprints reflect a global effort to develop the technology, with contributions from more than a dozen companies from Europe, the US, and Asia.

And yet, 5G is also pulling nations apart—with the US and China anchoring the tug-of-war. Tensions between Washington and Beijing over trade, human rights, the handling of Covid-19, and Chinese misinformation are escalating global divisions around the deployment of 5G. A growing number of countries are aligning with either a Western or a Chinese version of the tech.

“National security and commercial interests are all entangled, and it’s very hard to separate them,” says Scott Wallsten, president of the Technology Policy Institute, a

Social Media Drops the Hammer on Team Trump

Social Media Drops the Hammer on Team Trump

It’s a familiar story. A person in a position of power, usually a white man, is subject to social or professional sanction after someone draws attention to old, offensive comments on social media that few people noticed at the time. What makes the latest case unusual is that the white man is the president and absolutely everyone noticed the comments at the time.

On Monday morning, the streaming video platform Twitch temporarily suspended Donald Trump’s campaign account for violating its policies against “hateful content.” The company cited comments made in two recent streams. One was from Trump’s June 19 Tulsa rally, where the president described a lurid hypothetical in which “a very tough hombre is breaking into the window of a young woman whose husband is away.” The other was a rebroadcast of Trump’s 2015 campaign announcement speech, in which he infamously said of Mexican immigrants, “They’re bringing drugs. They’re

An Infrastructure Arms Race Is Fueling the Future of Gaming

An Infrastructure Arms Race Is Fueling the Future of Gaming

The future of gaming lives inside metal cages, if you believe some of the biggest gaming companies out there. Piled on hardware racks, blinking with little green lights, it’s calculated inside stacked-together computers and pumped out of a remote server through big underground tubes. It is distributed across the globe—Shanghai, London, Prague, Virginia—from nondescript, city block-sized architectural monoliths. To see it up close, you would need to pass through multiple levels of security.

Over the past two years, it seems every major gaming and tech company has launched a cloud gaming service: Microsoft’s Project xCloud, Sony’s PlayStation Now, Google’s Stadia, Nvidia’s GeForce Now, Tencent’s Start. Facebook and Amazon are reportedly sniffing around too. For a monthly fee—$10 to $35—users can play a library of videogames on demand, streamed to their phone, television, console, computer, or tablet.

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